General Debate on the Implementation of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

Netherlands, speaking on behalf of the European Union, reminded the members that the Vienna Declaration had called on States not to create a hierarchy of rights and had urged them not to justify human rights violations with cultural particularities. The European Union was concerned about persistent cases of persecution of human rights defenders and journalists, and it underlined the responsibility to ensure equality, non-discrimination and protection from violence for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people.

United Kingdom was clear in its belief that human rights were universal and should apply equally to all people everywhere. It was implacably opposed to all forms of discrimination and worked to uphold the rights and freedoms of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual people in all circumstances. The international community had to, without delay, work to address discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

Israel said the 1993 Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action recognized and affirmed that all human rights derived from the dignity and worth inherent in the human person, and affirmed that all human rights were universal, indivisible, interdependent and interrelated. It was clear that States had well-established obligations to respect, protect and fulfill the human rights of all persons, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transsexual individuals.

Greece focused its intervention on the situation of human rights defenders worldwide and the widespread discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Greece believed that human rights defenders faced increasing challenges in many parts of the world and were in need of effective protection.

Spain deplored discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons, as well as persecution based on religious, cultural and regional grounds. The persecution and conversion of religious minorities by terrorist groups was particularly alarming and Spain condemned such persecution regardless of whether it was perpetrated by State or non-State actors.

International Service for Human Rights raised the issue of ongoing human rights violations against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex persons and activists, including in Kyrgyzstan, Ukraine and Honduras.

Introduction

High Level Segment

Special rapporteur on Torture

Intersectionalities of Oppression: SOGI Issues in the Work of the Special Procedures

-Special rapporteur on the right to Adequate Housing

-Special rapporteur on Human Rights Defenders

-Special rapporteurs on Peaceful Assembly and Association and on Extra Judicial, Summary or Arbitrary Executions

-Special rapporteur on Freedom of Religion

-Special rapporteur on Cultural Rights

The Protection of the Family

The Human Rights Situation in Specific Countries

Commission of Inquiry on Syria

Special rapporteur on Human Rights in Iran

Other Country Contexts

Annual report of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

General Debate on the Implementation of the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action

Panel discussions

Human Rights and HIV/AIDS

Human Rights Mainstreaming

The Fiftieth Anniversary of the two Human Rights Covenants

Good practices with Respect to SOGI Rights

Deepening Intersectionality: Two controversial resolutions at the 31 HRC

-Resolution on Human Rights Defenders

-Resolutions on the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Universal Periodic Review: Outcome Reports

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For further information on HRC31:

Arvind Narrain | Geneva Director

Kim Vance | Executive Director

All documents referenced in this Report can be found here.